NEWS RELEASE Big Opportunity for CNL April 27 1200

Big Opportunity for CNL

The development of small modular reactors (SMR) is a big opportunity for Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL).

Big is not always better, and in this case there are a number of benefits for Canadians.

Recently, CNL hosted in Ottawa the premiere screening of The New Fire.

Filmed across four continents over the course of 22 months, The New Fire follows a group of young engineers and entrepreneurs, who are developing advanced nuclear technology, while working to overcome longstanding societal perceptions about nuclear energy and the role it will play in combating global climate change.

I was pleased to invite the former Premier of the Northwest Territories, Senator Dennis Patterson, to attend the screening.

While Senator Patterson sat in the territorial assembly, he represented Iqaluit and played a key role in the establishment of Nunavut as Canada’s newest territory in 1999.

He understands very clearly the challenges facing Canadians, who live in Canada’s far north.

One of the challenges facing residents living in Northern Canada is the high cost of living, which includes the cost of energy.

The high cost of electricity in many remote communities reflects the short shipping season and the use of diesel fuel to operate electricity generators.

Not only is that expensive, it is bad for the environment.

As a greenhouse gas-free source of energy, a SMR is an ideal solution to solve both problems.

A small module reactor (SMR) is one that produces anywhere from several hundred watts to a maximum of 300 MW.

A conventional reactor produces about 800 MW electrical.

Module refers to the construction style and reactor refers to the energy source.

In today’s world, our standard of living is determined by energy, economy and the environment.

Any energy related solution must satisfy all three requirements. Energy policies take a very long time and great effort.

It takes just as long to undo mistakes as Ontario residents are now discovering with the  Hydro One/wind turbine scandal. By supporting SMR research and development, Canada has the opportunity to get it right the first time.

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